Category Archives: Scene Analyses

The Big Lebowski

“The Man in Me” – Bob Dylan

“Hotel California” – Gypsy Kings

 

Buy “The Big Lebowski Original Soundtrack”

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“This Time Tomorrow” – The Darjeeling Limited

“This time tomorrow, where will you be?”

Well, Adrien Brody knows he’ll be on a train in India. But figuratively, he has no idea where that’s taking him.

Let the adventure begin!

Youtube Link To Song

Buy “The Darjeeling Limited (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)” on iTunes

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“Take Five”

In this classy scene from the film Constantine (2005), the velvety sound of  Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five”  is used as background, diagetic music. I wonder what prompted director Francis Lawrence to place this smooth, jazz tune in an action/adventure film where Keanu eventually gives Satan the finger?

One thing’s for sure,  the jazz adds a certain warmth to the scene;  it creates a relaxing and casual atmosphere, like that found in a coffee shop. However, the placidity of the jazz directly contrasts the violence of the subject matter being discussed within the scene –  Beeman is displaying his unique assortment of weapons to Constantine, weapons that will eventually help Constantine kick some demon ass.

Though…..I gotta admit, shooting the “Dragon’s Breath” looks way cooler/classier/sexier when it’s being accompanied by a smooth saxophone in the background.

Buy “Take Five” on iTunes

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Screencast Analysis

This is a scene from the film The Royal Tenenbaums directed by Wes Anderson. The video is entitled, “By Way of the Green Line Bus” with music by Nico – “These Days.”

Click Here to View The Screencast

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“In Dreams” – Blue Velvet

Blue Velvet (1986) is director David Lynch’s surrealist take on Reagan-era suburban America. The film thematically illustrates the duality in “normal” society; suggesting that below the harmless and modern utopian surface, lies a heinous and demoralized interior.

Lynch, well known for his meticulous sound design, employs music as a means to enhance characterization and thematic development. In the following two scenes, Lynch makes use of Roy Orbison’s 1963 hit, “In Dreams,” and juxtaposes Frank Booth’s celebratory appreciation of the “candy colored clown,” with his use of the song as a drug that fuels his homoerotic tendencies and need for physical and sexual dominance. The duality of the song’s use, and Frank’s character, is emblematic of the film’s overall thematic message of showcasing the overlooked dent on society’s windshield.

Hello world!

Welcome to SoundtrackCinema! This is a blog about movie soundtracks, background scores, sound editing, and just about anything sound related in films!

The main focus of this blog is to better understand the use of music and sound editing in films through various scene analyses and discussions! So feel free to contribute, have fun (mandatory!), and hopefully you’ll learn something new while you’re here!

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